Traditional Canadian Bannock Bread

This Traditional Canadian Bannock Bread recipe is super easy to make. If you enjoy making old recipes then this one is for you.

traditional canadian bannock bread

This Bannock Bread recipe is just like the Traditional Canadian bread they used to make and eat back in the 19th Century. If you want to know more about the origins of Bannock Bread check out this article on the history of bannock.

Just like most old recipes, this bannock bread is super easy to make. While you can easily make it by hand, I like to use my stand mixer to mix the dough ingredients.

fresh out of the oven
Bannock Bread fresh out of the Oven

But if you want to make it like they used to back in the old day, you will need to use your hands!

You can shape the dough into any shape before baking but if you are trying to make it just like they did back in the day you want to shape the bread dough like a big hockey puck or a thick frisbee. If you make it too thick it might take a little longer for it to cook.

traditional canadian bannock bread

Just like other quick bread recipes I have posted before like my traditional soda bread recipe, I love bread recipes like this one as there is no proofing or rising required as this recipe does not call for any yeast.

This means that this bread recipe can be made in less than an hour!

reader feedback

Reader Feedback

A perfect large bannock. Thanks for the recipe.

Émilie
traditional canadian bannock bread

This baked bannock bread can be served warm or at room temperature. It is typically served with any kind of jam or jelly but you can eat it however you want. My wife likes it warm with a little butter.

traditional canadian bannock bread

If you make homemade bread often you will notice that this bread dough is very sticky. Almost like something is not right with the dough mixture.

Don’t worry though, you can add a little All Purpose Flour to make it manageable but it will turn out.

slice of bannock bread

As you can see from the comments below some felt strongly this was not traditional as I did not use lard.

Lard, while available, is not as widely used as it used to be. Common substitutes include vegetable oil/olive oil, butter and vegetable shortening.

If you want to make this bannock bread recipe with lard, I would suggest using a generous 1/4 cup of lard (but less than 1/3 cup).

You will need the following ingredients to make this Traditional Canadian Bannock Bread recipe. For ingredient amounts please refer to the printable recipe card at the bottom of this post.

  • All Purpose Flour
  • Baking Powder
  • Milk
  • Vegetable Oil
  1. Preheat the oven to 400°F.
  2. In a large bowl, mix together flour, baking powder, milk and oil. Stir until dough comes together in a ball. The dough will be very sticky at this point. You can add a little more all purpose flour but do not overmix the dough.
  3. Shape the dough into a rough oval or circle. Place on a parchment-lined baking sheet.
    bread dough
  4. Bake for 35-45 minutes or until it is a beautiful golden brown. A toothpick should come out clean.

Printable Recipe Card

traditional canadian bannock bread

Traditional Canadian Bannock Bread

This Traditional Canadian Bannock Bread recipe is super easy to make. If you enjoy making old recipes then this one is for you.
4.33 from 37 votes
Prep Time10 minutes
Cook Time45 minutes
Total Time55 minutes
Course Bread Recipes
Cuisine Canadian
Servings 10
Calories 332 kcal

Equipment

  • Baking Sheet
  • Bowl for Mixing

Ingredients
 

  • 6 Cups All Purpose Flour
  • 6 Tbsp Baking Powder
  • 3 ½ Cups Milk, warmed
  • ¼ Cup Vegetable Oil

Instructions
 

  • Preheat the oven to 400°F.
  • In a large bowl, mix together flour, baking powder, milk and oil. Stir until dough comes together in a ball. The dough will be very sticky at this point. You can add a little more all purpose flour but do not overmix the dough.
  • Shape the dough into rough oval or circle. Place on a parchment lined baking sheet.
  • Bake for 35-45 minutes or until it is a beautiful golden brown. A toothpick should come out clean.

Nutrition

Calories: 332kcalCarbohydrates: 65gProtein: 10gFat: 4gSaturated Fat: 2gPolyunsaturated Fat: 1gMonounsaturated Fat: 1gCholesterol: 9mgSodium: 45mgPotassium: 920mgFiber: 2gSugar: 5gVitamin A: 138IUCalcium: 420mgIron: 4mg

Nutritional information provided for this recipe is based on 1 serving. This information is an estimate and may vary based on several factors. If nutritional information is important to you and your diet, please verify this recipe with a Registered Dietitian.

Tried this Recipe?Leave a Comment below and share a picture on Instagram and tag @hot_rods_recipes and hashtag #hotrodsrecipes!

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4.33 from 37 votes (20 ratings without comment)

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26 Comments

  1. Cynthia says:

    Good but to much baking powder, Use less baking powder when making this recipe

  2. Janet says:

    Love this bread. Great recipe.

  3. Justina Bearman says:

    Made this for our Canadian themed meal night. Turned out great! Just wondered if it could possibly be baked in a loaf tin thou? Thanks x

  4. Eileen says:

    I liked the recipe. It’s in the oven but I am expecting success. I added salt and melted lard. All good if that’s what you want. I’m sure traditionally it wasn’t melted in the microwave. Really looking forward to this.

  5. Tanya M says:

    My family’s recipe, that has been handed down for generations uses no milk, lard or oil. It’s just flour, baking powder, salt and water, mixed together by hand, only.

  6. Marie says:

    How thick should the dough be prior to baking? I make a soda bread that specifies 1 1/2″ thick before baking.

    Thanks!

    Marie

    1. Steph says:

      After mixing it was still basically soup. After adding 2 full cups of flower, it was still to thin to pick up. Basically poured it onto a pan. Stuck like crazy to pan and was rock hard.
      I think there has to be a typo. Maybe 3/4 cup of milk. One cup max

  7. Cheryl says:

    Well i tried it, and the outside of my bannock turned out pretty hard 🤣🤣🤣 but inside of it is kinda soft so I just hope it tastes great lol then again I didn’t have enough flour so I had to cut everything in half. Maybe next time it will turn out good.

  8. Will says:

    We use the same recipe to make drop biscuits. I am originally from Louisiana now on in southern California.

  9. Naomi Bosum says:

    I am an aboriginal and we don’t use oil in our bannock but I’m sure it’s still good. Also, you’re missing 2 other ingredients. 🙂

    1. bill says:

      What other ingredients would you include Naomi? Thank You

    2. Cynthia says:

      It could be the Scottish Traditional recipe, since the Scottish people made it 1st and interduce it to you guys and you guys adopted it from the Scottish in the 19th century.

  10. Sacha W. says:

    I just made this. It fries REALLY well. I baked half, and fried the other half in about 90 gram pieces. Fry in shallow oil at medium temperature for about 10 minutes a side. Will be golden brown and delicious.

  11. Christine James says:

    I made this recipe with my students, and they loved it! They can easily make it on their own and be successful at home. Thank You, Chef Rodney!

  12. Angel says:

    This is super easy and it just needed salt and yes it’s supposed to be lard but vegetable oil is totally fine. My family loved this

    1. Good to hear you liked it! Thanks for letting me know!

  13. Abby says:

    This bread is super to make and my family loved it. Very easy to make and very tasty.

    1. Ash says:

      The 5 white gifts given to indigenous people included white flour so real traditional bannock is made from corn, nuts and/or flour from plant bulbs. You really should take the “traditional” part out of your recipe since there’s not a whole lot that’s traditional about it.

      1. Émilie says:

        A perfect large bannock. Thanks for the recipe.

  14. Linda Winkler says:

    Traditional bannock is made with lard not oil. That’s what the aboriginals use and it gives a distinctive flavour. Your recipe is not traditional.

    1. Vegetable Oil is a perfectly acceptable substitute for lard and most home cooks do not keep lard on hand. Thanks for pointing that out though.

    2. Janice Catcheway says:

      You are correct and can still make this using lard

      Meegwetch ❤
      Janice Catcheway

      1. Arlene Mccarthy says:

        I made this with Tenderflake Lard. I melted the lard to 1/4 cup but I also added 1 Tsp salt. when baked I always brush the top with melted butter, absolutely delicious.

    3. Grant Beacock says:

      It is funny I was sitting here trying to remember how We used lard to make our bannock. I lived in Nelson house Manitoba Canada with the Cree people and made it with lard and sometimes with powdered white fish or just the roe from any fish we caught that day. Traveled with powder white fish and forge or huanted. Always basic flour, lard, baking powder for our food supply for a week.

    4. paige says:

      how much lard would be used instead of vegetable oil?

  15. Karen Eddings says:

    Hi Rodney. I have not tired any of your recipe ,but I would to but am living with my daughter. who has me watching my weight so can’t alway do what I want to I love baking .All of your recipe look great .My be sometime I can try them Thank you